Exhibits

The goal of the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre exhibits is to educate visitors not he unique history of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation as we host them in the tradition of our ancestors.

Permanent Art Collection and Interpretive Displays 

Sun-moon-Window-small

The Centre holds several large scale art pieces, as well as several small pieces. One of our more recognizable pieces is Mark Preston’s Sun Moon Window situated near the left side of the main entrance. Mark Preston is a Tlingit artist, who’s work can be found in the Centre, as well as around Whitehorse and various other towns across Canada.  Equally, our “Windows to the Past” is our collection of large historic photographs that are hung as transparencies in the windows that line the western side of the Cultural Centre. The images capture both the cultural continuity and change in the shared landscape, and illuminate the Kwanlin Dün history of persistence and resilience. The images were researched and provided by the Yukon Archives, while the Centre was being built in 2011 and 2012.

canoe high res

 Other large sculptures include our moiety on the right hand side of the main entrance. The moiety designed by artist Justin Smith illustrates the two Kwanlin Dün clans wolf and crow in traditional forms and colours.

The largest of our sculptures is situated at the north end of the building, our dug-out canoe is housed in the canoe pavilion. The canoe was a  project created by local carvers at the Sun Dog Retreat now known as the Northern Cultural Expressions Society.

 On June 21st, 2012 the Cultural Centre’s grand opening; the canoe was rowed down the Yukon River from the traditional carving camp, and docked on the banks in front of the Centre. It has since resided in the canoe pavilion and used for interpretive purposes. Occasionally, it does still get used for traditional ceremonies and cultural displays.

Our hallways feature many other smaller works including beaded moccasins and frontlets displayed in glass cases. These items are part of the Yukon Government’s permanent art collection. Information about the respective artist can be found onsite.